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The AEngD allows EngD centres and other AEngD partners to publicise their vacancies. Search by centre, institution name or a subject keyword.
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ENGINEERING FOR A SAFER WORLD

Application closing date 26 July 2017, employment start date 1 October 2017
CDT in Quantitative Non-destructive Evaluation
Imperial College London and the Universities of Bristol, Manchester, Nottingham, Strathclyde and Warwick
Applications are invited for research engineers to work with UK-based companies and universities from the world-leading Research Centre in Non-Destructive Evaluation.  Non-destructive Evaluation (NDE) employs sensor and imaging technology to assess the condition of components, plant and engineering structures of all kinds during manufacture and in-service. This key technology area underpins the safe and sustainable future of a broad cross-section of UK industry including power generation, oil & gas, aerospace, defence and high value manufacturing.  Novel NDE technologies are required to meet new and emerging safety, environmental and engineering challenges. Addressing these challenges will involve a diverse range of research areas, including topics such as: advanced sensor and imaging; large-area methods; automation & robotics; modelling & reliability; remote & non-contact NDE; new inspection technologies; data fusion & visualisation; and permanently installed sensors. We have funding for a number of EngD projects this year, with industrial sponsors including end-users as well as companies in the NDE supply chain.

Enhanced Heating Strategies for Composites Manufacture

Application closing date 31 July 2017, employment start date 4 September 2017
IDC in Composites Manufacture
University of Bristol
This project represents a very exciting opportunity for a Research Engineer to join a company at the forefront of technology development in composite materials and manufacture, helping to develop new, innovative products for a variety of interesting applications. The project will be based at Heraeus Noblelight on the Cambridge Science Park, where the Research Engineer will join a team of industry experts in the field of heating systems for composites manufacture. The project will be focused on optimizing heating strategies for composites manufacture. Current heating systems, including infrared lamps, hot gas torches and lasers, are not optimized for composites manufacturing processes such as Automated Fibre Placement, Filament Winding and Thermoforming. This project will provide the theoretical and experimental basis for developing the most appropriate heating strategy for each process. Heraeus Noblelight has invented and developed a breakthrough heating system based on their Xenon flashlamp technology. This system is capable of providing pulsed, broadband energy for the heating of composites in a range of manufacturing processes and has been shown to have significant benefits over existing heating sources. The technology has been developed over 5 years in collaboration with the National Composites Centre in Bristol and is now breaking into the composites market. The project will concentrate on understanding and comparing this new technology with existing heat sources, and guiding the further development of the Xenon flashlamp heating system. To achieve these goals, the Research Engineer will require a combination of theoretical and practical skills. They will undertake a detailed study of the available heating technologies for a range of composites manufacturing processes and build an understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of each one. This may involve designing and implementing physical laboratory experiments, creating analytical and numerical models to describe the processes involved, testing and evaluating composite materials and developing an in-depth knowledge of the complex physics-based principles underlying the processes. In addition to the research-based activities, the Research Engineer will be expected to contribute fully to a skilled and highly motivated team of experts, taking part in customer trials, design review and dissemination activities.

Advanced Resin & Composites Application Development

Application closing date 31 July 2017, employment start date 4 September 2017
IDC in Composites Manufacture
University of Bristol
Scott Bader Co Ltd. is actively researching new polymers for fibre reinforced composite applications. Two areas of current interest are: Processing – supporting the industry needs to reduce production cycle times and developing new resins for use in processes other than the typical infusion and Resin Transfer Moulding (RTM), commonly employed with Scott Bader resins. Health and sustainability – developing resins with reduced atmospheric emissions during processing, reduced hazards during use, improved capability for end-of-life product recycling, reduced reliance on oil derived raw materials and reduced whole-life environmental impact of composite materials. Each topic is at a stage that much of the fundamental polymer development is already understood through existing projects within Scott Bader. Consequently application development is needed, with respect to performance and processing, forming the basis of a portfolio of related projects for the Engineering Doctorate researcher. Dedicated resource from the R&D Polymer development team is available at Scott Bader’s headquarters in the UK where purpose-built technical facilities provide R&D as well as complete evaluation, testing and application support.

The behaviour, simulation and control of composite laminate deformation during component moulding under semi-rigid and matched mould tooling

Application closing date 31 July 2017, employment start date 4 September 2017
IDC in Composites Manufacture
University of Bristol
In order to develop a robust and well optimised manufacturing process that can both accommodate material and manufacturing variation and can be scaled to a range of component types and scales, it is highly desirable to be able to accurately and efficiently simulate the range of material deformation and flow processes that occur during composite de-bulking/forming and moulding processes. Study will include simulation and validation preform/tool interaction when moulding under semi-rigid and rigid press tooling. It is expected to make use of highly instrumented processing equipment to both validate models and to inform the process/tooling design and controls/instrumentation needed to create reliable and repeatable component mouldings. All EngD students are supervised by an academic and an industrial supervisor and are registered at the University of their academic supervisor. Rolls-Royce is a Power Systems company: for more than a hundred years Rolls-Royce have been providing power for aircraft, ships and land applications. Their vision is to provide “better power for a changing world”. Better, because their customers need their systems to become more efficient all the time as they respond to the growing demand for all types of power in a fast changing world. Rolls-Royce are best known for their aero engines, that power many of the world’s most advanced passenger jets, like the new Airbus A350 and the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. But, there is much more to the company than that. Rolls-Royce also produce low–emission power systems for ships, some of which are designed by Rolls-Royce. They power a wide array of land vehicles: ranging from trains to combine harvesters, and build engines that can generate electricity.

Exploring and understanding the role of material, manufacturing process and fibre architecture on impact containment efficiency for composite containment systems

Application closing date 31 July 2017, employment start date 4 September 2017
IDC in Composites Manufacture
University of Bristol
Study concerns composite materials, methods of manufacture and fibre architecture for the containment of impact threats across a range of engine sizes.  A comparison of impact capabilities and behaviour and other key attributes including: cost, weight and producibility, will be made. The study will be based on representative sub-component feature impact tests and their simulation. It should also datamine publically available information for other attributes/considerations and data from subject-matter experts in Rolls-Royce. The composite options available will be compared to best metallic offerings as a benchmark. All EngD students are supervised by an academic and an industrial supervisor and are registered at the University of their academic supervisor. Rolls-Royce is a Power Systems company: for more than a hundred years Rolls-Royce have been providing power for aircraft, ships and land applications. Their vision is to provide “better power for a changing world”. Better, because their customers need their systems to become more efficient all the time as they respond to the growing demand for all types of power in a fast changing world. Rolls-Royce are best known for their aero engines, that power many of the world’s most advanced passenger jets, like the new Airbus A350 and the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. But, there is much more to the company than that. Rolls-Royce also produce low–emission power systems for ships, some of which are designed by Rolls-Royce. They power a wide array of land vehicles: ranging from trains to combine harvesters, and build engines that can generate electricity.

Optimisation of weaving parameters and weave architecture for 3D woven composites with geometry

Application closing date 31 July 2017, employment start date 4 September 2017
IDC in Composites Manufacture
University of Bristol
3D weaving has the potential to reduce manufacturing costs and improve product performance in comparison to conventional broadcloth materials. Complex parts (such as a fan blade) is made with up to 1000 plies with each ply having different geometry and orientation. This makes preforming with 2D materials a complex and time consuming task and require sophisticated ply-kitting equipment.  3D weaving has the potential to produce a near-net preform in one piece with a significant reduction in labour cost and manufacturing cycle time. However, 3D woven preforms are not ideal for parts with complex (single/double) curvatures.  The main focus of this project is to develop 3D weaving technology for parts with complex curvatures such as fan blades.  This would involve local variations to the weave design, selective tensioning of certain stuffers and binders, selective modifications to inter-tow spacing in the region that require large in-plane shear.  In addition to 3D weaving technology, the project will focus on analysis of tow geometry especially in the regions of large curvature and predicting in-plane properties using FE analysis. The work will also look at how weave architecture, shed settings and geometry could be optimised for specific applications. X-ray CT will be employed to measure three-dimensional geometry of tows in the region of interest. Sigmatex develops and manufactures carbon fibre textiles for composite material applications. From global locations, Sigmatex supplies woven carbon fibre textiles including 3D, spread tow, innegra, recycled, unidirectional, multiaxial, and 2D woven solutions across a broad spread of industries, ranging from the world’s top supercar manufacturers to high performance leisure brands and most of the world’s major aerospace companies.  In all cases, Sigmatex helps its customers to achieve improved product performance through lightweight strength. Sigmatex was established in 1986 and has specialised in helping customers create cutting edge carbon fibre textiles since then. Sigmatex has a very well equipped technical department which works with customers to develop advanced and innovative carbon fibre textile solutions. Materials are designed to meet all quality requirements, specifications and performance criteria. Areas which affect materials performance can be tailored and include fibre orientation, crimp, drapeability, thickness and resin permeability. This approach, which has led to the development of products such as 3D woven carbon fibre, results in an improvement in the performance, reliability and cost of carbon fibre structure fabrication, and enables the use of carbon fibre in new applications. These textile solutions often require a dynamic, innovative approach to design for manufacture, in addition to expert knowledge about carbon fibre, which is the core strength of Sigmatex.

future applied research projects in Advanced Fibre Placement, Automated Dry Fabric Placement, Braiding technology, In-process monitoring and High Temperature RTM

Application closing date 31 July 2017, employment start date 4 September 2017
IDC in Composites Manufacture
University of Bristol
The National Composites Centre in Bristol currently supports a number on Engineering Doctorate students, in collaboration with the EPSRC funded Industrial Doctorate Centre in Composites Manufacture (www.cimcomp.ac.uk/IDC). With several EngD projects nearing successful completion, and significant recent investment in new manufacturing technologies, the NCC seeks eligible applicants to undertake future applied research projects in areas such as Advanced Fibre Placement, Automated Dry Fabric Placement, Braiding technology, In-process monitoring and High Temperature RTM, with Design for manufacture focus in all technologies. There is also interest in Manufacturing informatics and Automated NDT and Metrology, with specific application to composites. The NCC therefore aims to support new EngD projects in some of these areas. Applicants with ‘home student’ status and holding or about to graduate with a 2.1 or better first degree in structural or chemical engineering, materials science or physical sciences should send their CV in the first instance to idc@bristol.ac.uk.

Understanding and communicating impacts of water resource infrastructure removal

Application closing date 2 June 2017, employment start date 2 October 2017
STREAM: Industrial Doctorate Centre for the Water Sector
Newcastle University
Restoration of river environments by removal of infrastructure is a challenge worldwide due to the risk involved in the process and the potential effects on multiple stakeholders. The aim of the proposed project is to understand the changes to lake and river hydrological regimes due to future infrastructure removal, devise a decision making framework that integrates environmental, flood risk and other stakeholder concerns and to develop visualisation tools and techniques to engage stakeholders. It will be based on Crummock Water in the Lake District National Park which is designated as part of a Special Area of Conservation under the Habitats Regulation. The Lake District is highly valued for its landscapes and tourism is an extremely important contributor to the local economy. United Utilities have committed to investigating the feasibility of removing the abstraction related infrastructure at Crummock after 2022. Infrastructure removal has the potential to provide significant ecological benefits to Crummock and the downstream River Cocker by eliminating barriers to fish migration and sediment transport, and by allowing a natural flow regime. However, there are many other interests and issues that need to be understood and addressed before infrastructure removal can be progressed. There could a risk, or a perceived risk that weir removal will increase flood risk. Weir removal will change the lake level and this could have negative impacts on visual amenity in the short term. There will be significant regulator and stakeholder interest in any plans that are taken forward by UU. This will include the regulators and Planning Authority; the Environment Agency, Natural England and the Lake District National Park Authority, the landowners; National Trust and others, and stakeholders including Friends of the Lake District, West Cumbria Rivers Trust, flood action groups and anglers.

Advancing the use of Flow Cytometry (FCM) in the water sector

Application closing date 2 June 2017, employment start date 2 October 2017
STREAM: Industrial Doctorate Centre for the Water Sector
Newcastle University
Water and wastewater treatment is an inherently complex process: inputs are highly variable, the standards to which they must be treated are set on a precautionary principle and the performance of processes is not well understood or well controlled. The design and operation of treatment process is therefore understandably risk averse, leading to over-engineered processes that are costly to run. Flow cytometry (FCM) is a simple technology, which simultaneously measures multiple parameters of single particles as they flow in a fluid stream through a laser beam. Following a move by the Swiss drinking water quality regulator to approve FCM for regulatory compliance monitoring, Northumbrian Water Group (NWG) has developed a FCM-based water quality index on to enhance its risk-based approach to managing drinking water quality. The use of FCM in drinking water is in its infancy in the UK water industry so there is an opportunity to influence emerging methodologies and future standards; the use of FCM in wastewater management has not been explored at all so there is a clear opportunity to demonstrate leadership and innovation within the industry and scientific community. This project will: determine the true cost and throughput of FCM, and the challenges faced in moving FCM out of the lab; evaluate the processes that may benefit from this technology and how it may influence decisions around future design and operation; develop and demonstrate how FCM can be used as an analogue for conventional water and wastewater quality characterisation; evaluate the potential contribution of FCM to supporting modelling and simulation of microbial systems; develop accessible data analysis pipelines for the water industry and environmental management sectors, including data management and visualisation; and use case studies to apply the technologies to those process likely to benefit.

AEngD urges more EngD investment from UK Government

(19 April 2017) - The AEngD has published its response to the UK Government's industry strategy green paper, highlighting the…

Save the date: AEngD annual conference 2017 will be on 29 November

(03 March 2017) - The next national conference of the Association of Engineering Doctorates will be held at the British Library…

EngD graduate named in Forbes 30 Under 30 Europe

(26 January 2017) - EngD graduate Marek Kubik has been named in the second Forbes 30 Under 30 Europe listing for his…